Written in TypeScript, using Bolt JS framework and sprinkled with developer tips along the way

Cover image of this article featuring Slack and Netlify logo.
Cover image of this article featuring Slack and Netlify logo.
Image created by the author featuring Slack and Netlify logo.

Introduction

Netlify Functions are Netlify’s version of serverless functions — a single-purpose script deployed to a managed hosting provider, in this case, Netlify, that scales on-demand. Bolt JS is a framework to build Slack apps using JavaScript. I was curious about combining these two together, and with no guidance on how to do so, I ended up researching this subject quite a bit and eventually, figuring it out. This how-to guide aims at explaining how to create a TypeScript-based Slack app using Bolt JS and run it as a serverless function using Netlify Functions.

I understand that this a lengthy how-to…


Demystifying the process of making your eBook readable on various device types

Cover image feature the Kindle Create logo on an abstract design created by the author.
Cover image feature the Kindle Create logo on an abstract design created by the author.
Image created by the author featuring the Kindle Create logo.

The road to self-publishing can be overwhelming especially when there are so many different aspects to look at. One major chunk of work involves formatting your manuscript so that it’s readable on different devices. Not knowing where to start or how to join all the dots can be frustrating, so to make your life easier, I’ve put together a simple guide that explains this process and I also provide some insight based on the experience of going through this process myself.

Preface

This guide is catered toward formatting your eBook only. For paperback options, different steps might be involved. This guide…


An easy-to-digest four-part article to help you get started with Sass

Featured image of this article feature a puppy.
Featured image of this article feature a puppy.
Photo by Alvan Nee on Unsplash

Introduction

Broken down into four easy-to-digest parts, this article aims at getting your feet wet with Sass. Once you’re comfortable with how everything fits together, you can move onto more complex concepts. To aid our learning process and compile Sass files, we’ll be using Scout-App.


A simple guide to hosting your single page application

Cover image for this article featuring React’s logo, GitHub’s logo, and GitHub Actions logo.
Cover image for this article featuring React’s logo, GitHub’s logo, and GitHub Actions logo.
Featured logo’s left to right: React, GitHub and GitHub Actions. Image created by the author.

Introduction

I recently created a website using the Create React App starter template to demonstrate an npm package I developed. I thought it would be pretty straightforward to deploy this site using GitHub Pages, however, I was wrong. After some trial and error, I managed to sort it out. This article aims at recreating the scenario and walking you through the process of solving each problem we encounter along the way.

#1 Starting point

Let’s start with a common base. We’ll begin by creating a React app using the Create React App utility and also…


Confidently create workflow files in your GitHub repository

Screenshot of a GitHub repository over this Unsplash image

Introduction

I’ve only recently dived into GitHub Actions and I’m amazed at what it can do. To put it simply, GitHub Actions helps you create workflows — this is not limited to a CI/CD pipeline, you can also create various automation tasks like automatically labelling issues when they’re created, linting code with every pull request, notifying a Slack channel when a package is updated in the GitHub registry— and all of this is done within the GitHub code repository itself.

In this article, we’ll have a look at the fundamental components of GitHub…


Publishing tests results so you can examine them in your CI tool of choice

Cover image for this article featuring a React logo along with Jest logo
Cover image for this article featuring a React logo along with Jest logo
React logo on the left. Jest logo on the right.

The Create React App template comes with a lot of boilerplate code that should get you up and running with a simple React app in no time. You can then build on top of that and make it as swanky as you’d like.

If you open up the package.json file, you’ll see a few scripts you can run.

Create React App uses Jest as its test runner. Executing npm run test will run the unit tests that come pre-built with the app. …


Without losing your Spotify playlists and liked songs

A 3D icon concept of Spotify’s logo.
A 3D icon concept of Spotify’s logo.
Photo by Alexander Shatov on Unsplash

Introduction

For the longest time, I used to use Facebook to log in to Spotify. However, recently I thought of removing this dependency and switching over to the regular email address and password combination to log in to Spotify. A major concern I had was I might lose my playlists and liked songs over something so trivial, and it would be a total hassle to put that list back together. I couldn’t find a definitive answer, so I thought of writing this piece for anyone else who might have the same question.


Deploy your website on the edge of the Internet

Cloudflare Logo
Cloudflare Logo
Cloudflare logo over an image from Unsplash.

What is Cloudflare Pages?

So, you’re a frontend developer and have built an amazing portfolio website? It works great locally and now you’re wanting to show the rest of the world what an amazing site you’ve built, but you’re puzzled with all the various hosting options available? Some are too expensive for hosting a simple website, some are just too complex and some, well, look a bit fishy! Don’t worry — allow me to introduce you to Cloudflare Pages.

Cloudflare Pages enables you to deploy your frontend application straight from your GitHub repository. All you…


An emotional roller coaster

Photo of a mother holding her child in her arms.
Photo of a mother holding her child in her arms.
Image from Unsplash

“Yes, everything is set. We’ll stop at a diner on our way to Pune and I’ll ask her to wait in the diner and order us some food while I fill up the tank. What she won’t know is that while she waits for me in the diner, I’ll be on my way back to Mumbai,” said Rajeev.

“Are you sure you want to go ahead with this?” asked the person on the other side of the phone.

“Yes,” affirmed Rajeev, although he still sounded a bit nervous.

Rajeev was a thirty-six-year-old investment banker who lived…


Including and excluding files in your npm package

Image of a cat popping out of a box.
Image of a cat popping out of a box.
Image from Unsplash.

Introduction

After publishing an article on developing and publishing an npm package using TypeScript, I received a suggestion on Twitter to “create .npmignore in addition to .gitignore or else your dist won’t be included (if dist is in .gitignore).” While this is true (you don’t need to add a .npmignore file if you’re using the files field in the package.json file), given that all three approaches affect what get’s included in your npm package, I wrote this article to try and demystify the process.

Let’s take a look at these scenarios to understand…

Clyde D'Souza

Software developer. Teaches online at @skillshare. Created @lightnsparknpo. Author of http://mamatellmeastory.clydedsouza.net

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